Xolo Era 4K With 4G Support, 4000mAh Battery Launched

Xolo Era 4K With 4G Support, 4000mAh Battery Launched at Rs. 6,499

Xolo has launched the Era 4K smartphone in India. Priced at Rs. 6,499, the smartphone will be available exclusively .Interested users can register themselves to buy the smartphone. The registration window is open until 9:59am IST on next Monday, with sales opening at 10:00am on the same day (February 22).

The Xolo Era 4K smartphone features a 5-inch HD (720×1280 pixels) IPS display with full lamination, Corning Gorilla Glass 3 protection with Native Damage Resistance (NDR), and pixel density of 294ppi. It runs Android 5.1 Lollipop out-of-the-box. The dual-SIM (Micro-SIM + Micro-SIM) handset is powered by a 64-bit 1GHz quad-core processor clubbed with 2GB of DDR3 RAM. It packs 8GB of inbuilt storage and supports expandable storage via microSD card (up to 32GB).

It sports an 8-megapixel rear camera with 5P Largan Lens and dual LED flash along with a 5-megapixel front-facing camera with f/2.2 aperture. Some of the camera features of the Xolo Era 4K include Face Beautify, Smile Detection, Proximity Capture, Gesture Capture, Face Detection, and Multi Angle View Mode. Connectivity options include GPRS/ EDGE, 4G LTE, GPS, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, FM radio, and Micro-USB.

Measuring 143×71.8×9.2mm, the Xolo Era 4K weighs 157 grams and will be available in a White and Dark Blue colour variants. It is backed by a 4000mAh battery, which is rated to deliver up to 17 hours of talk time and 528 hours of standby time on 3G connectivity.

The specifications of the Xolo Era 4K smartphone match with that of Micromax Canvas Juice 4G smartphone. The dual-SIM 4G-enabled handset, which was introduced earlier this month features the same display, RAM, camera, and battery. However, the smartphone includes 4GB inbuilt storage. Although the company is yet to launch the handset officially, it is listed on the company website and is available to buy from e-commerce websites.

New App Turns Android Smartphones Into Earthquake Detectors

New App Turns Android Smartphones Into Earthquake Detectors

Researchers have developed an app that can turn smartphones into a worldwide seismic network that could eventually warn users of impending jolts from a nearby earthquake.

With the help of a smartphone’s accelerometer – the motion-detection instrument – the app, called MyShake taps a phone’s ability to record ground shaking from an earthquake.

The android app, which can be downloaded from Google Play Store, runs in the background with little power, so that a phone’s onboard accelerometers can record local shaking any time of the day or night.

For now, the app only collects information from the accelerometers, analyses it and, if it fits the vibrational profile of a quake, relays it and the phone’s GPS coordinates to the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, for analysis.

However, once enough people are using it, the seismologists plan to use the data to warn people miles from ground zero that shaking is rumbling their way.

“MyShake cannot replace traditional seismic networks like those run by the US Geological Survey, UC Berkeley, the University of Washington and Caltech, but we think MyShake can make earthquake early warning faster and more accurate in areas that have a traditional seismic network, and can provide life-saving early warning in countries that have no seismic network,” said the leader of the app projectRichard Allen from the University of California, Berkeley.

A crowd-sourced seismic network may be the only option today for many earthquake-prone developing countries, such as Nepal or Peru, that have a sparse or no ground-based seismic network or early warning system, but do have millions of smartphone users.

“In my opinion, this is cutting-edge research that will transform seismology,” UC Berkeley graduate student Qingkai Kong, who developed the algorithm at the heart of the app, said.

Smartphones can easily measure movement caused by a quake because they have three built-in accelerometers designed to sense the orientation of the phone for display or gaming.

While constantly improving in sensitivity for the benefit of gamers, however, smartphone accelerometers are far less sensitive than in-ground seismometers.

But they are sensitive enough to record earthquakes above a magnitude 5 — the ones that do damage — within 10 kilometres.

And what these accelerometers lack in sensitivity, they make up for in ubiquity. There are an estimated one billion smartphones worldwide, the researchers said.

In a paper published in the journal Science Advances, the researchers described the algorithm in the mobile app that analyses a phone’s accelerometer data and distinguishes earthquake shaking from normal vibrations, such as walking, dancing or dropping the phone.

In simulated tests, the algorithm that the researchers developed successfully distinguished quakes from non-quakes 93 percent of the time.